Published: 03 Jul 2015 | Last Updated: 03 Jul 2015 13:54:59

A new study undertaken using VetCompass data has been published online in the journal Veterinary Surgery this week:

Epidemiology of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease Diagnosis in Dogs Attending Primary-Care Veterinary Practices in England. Taylor-Brown FE, Meeson RL, Brodbelt DC, Church DB, McGreevy PD, Thomson PC & O'Neill DG. (June 2015; Epub ahead of print) Veterinary Surgery

In this study, health records of 953 dogs diagnosed with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) disease from a population of 171,522 dogs attending 97 primary-care practices in England were reviewed in detail to estimate the prevalence of CCL disease diagnosis in UK canines, evaluate risk factors for diagnosis and describe the management of cases attending UK primary-care veterinary practices.

The prevalence of CCL disease diagnosis was estimated at 0.56% (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.59). Compared with crossbred dogs, Rottweilers, West Highland White Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Yorkshire Terriers, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers showed increased odds of CCL disease diagnosis while Cocker Spaniels showed reduced odds. Increasing bodyweight within breeds was associated with increased odds of diagnosis. Dogs aged over 3 years had increased odds of diagnosis compared with dogs aged less than 3 years. Neutered females had 2.1 times the odds of diagnosis compared with entire females. Insured dogs had 4 times the odds of diagnosis compared with uninsured dogs. Two-thirds of cases were managed surgically, with insured and heavier dogs more frequently undergoing surgery. Overall, 21% of cases were referred, with referral more frequent in heavier and insured dogs. Referred dogs more frequently had surgery and an osteotomy procedure.

The breed predispositions and demographic risk factors identified in this study can be used to help direct future research on canine CCL disease and inform decisions on the clinical management of dogs diagnosed with the condition.

Click here to read the study abstract in full (published online ahead of print).

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