Veterinary Clinical Podcasts

Subscribe for free

Share

  • 32 Radiography and Radiology In Practice: Top Ten Tips

    Sun, 22 Feb 2015

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 01:30:26

    Access to plain radiography is very widespread now in veterinary medicine. As with any diagnostic test it is essential to make sure that we use this modality in the best ways possible for our patients, their carers and indeed our personal and professional performance. In this episode I am joined by Andrew Parry who is a European specialist in Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging and a member of the Diagnostic Imaging team at the QMHA. Most of this long episode is spent discussing Andy's top 10 tips for how to get the most value out of plain radiography and radiology but we also talk about advanced imaging modalities that are becoming increasingly available and consider some of the issues surrounding this development.

    To summarise, Andy's top 10 tips were as follows:

    1. The more specific the question that you want to answer is, the more likely the imaging modality will answer it. Imaging used as a screening tool is rarely very useful. Make sure the appropriate imaging has been done. When do we use a retrograde study for example?
    2. Pay attention to patient positioning.
    3. Using an exposure guide in practice can be really useful.
    4. Just because you are using a CR system, you should still be careful about radiographic technique.
    5. When imaging the thorax, a high KV, high mA and low S technique should be used. When imaging the abdomen a low KV, high mA and higher S technique should be used.
    6. With dyspnoiec cats, you can take a DV thoracic radiograph by placing the cassette within the cat carrier and exposing through the open box. Most dyspnoiec cats will lie in a roughly DV position and it’s better than manual restraint.
    7. When imaging the thorax under sedation or anaesthesia, obtain the DV first, before the laterals. Inflate the chest if under GA.
    8. When obtaining limb radiographs, if you are uncertain whether a finding on one limb is truly significant, radiograph the contralateral limb.
    9. The more effort you put into your imaging study, the more likely you are to get a result. It’s all about making it easy for yourself.
    10. When describing a radiograph, describe the obvious things that you see first. That means you wont be constantly distracted by them.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk ; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 31 Lymphoma in Dogs and Cats

    Sat, 31 Jan 2015

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 01:15:48

    Lymphoma (previously often referred to as lymphosarcoma) is one of the most (if not the most?) common types of cancer to affect dogs and cats. In this episode we discuss lymphoma in general terms covering a variety of topics such as what it is, patient presentation, clinical approach to the patient, treatment options and prognosis. For this episode I am joined once again by Chiara Leo, Lecturer in Oncology at the Royal Veterinary College.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk ; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

    (Image: "Canine lymphoma 1" by Joel Mills - Own work (Wikipedia))

  • 30 Veterinary Ethics and Animal Welfare in Clinical Practice - Part 2

    Sun, 11 Jan 2015

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 45:47

    In and amongst all the science and medicine that are at the centre of veterinary practice, it is essential that we don't overlook the overarching principles and considerations relating to Ethics and Animal Welfare. After all, they have to be a guiding light for what we do in clinical practice. This is the second in a two-part mini-series of podcast episodes featuring Martin Whiting, Lecturer in Veterinary Ethics and Law here at the RVC. In these episodes we discuss a variety of topics and issues. We start with discussing what 'veterinary ethics' and 'animal welfare' mean and then spend the remainder of the time seeing how these concepts apply to a variety of small animal clinical scenarios. The podcasts end with some comments on professional ethics in the context of regulatory bodies.

    If you haven't listened to Part 1, we would recommend you do this before listening to this second episode.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk ; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 29 Veterinary Ethics and Animal Welfare in Clinical Practice - Part 1

    Sat, 20 Dec 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 57:39

    In and amongst all the science and medicine that are at the centre of veterinary practice, it is essential that we don't overlook the overarching principles and considerations relating to Ethics and Animal Welfare. After all, they have to be a guiding light for what we do in clinical practice. This is the first in a two-part mini-series of podcast episodes featuring Martin Whiting, Lecturer in Veterinary Ethics and Law here at the RVC. In these episodes we discuss a variety of topics and issues. We start with discussing what 'veterinary ethics' and 'animal welfare' mean and then spend the remainder of the time seeing how these concepts apply to a variety of small animal clinical scenarios. The podcasts end with some comments on professional ethics in the context of regulatory bodies. 

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 28 Corneal ulceration - Part 2

    Sat, 29 Nov 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 35:28

    This is the second part in the two-part mini-series on corneal ulceration in dogs and cats with Màrian Matas Riera who is a lecturer in Ophthalmology here at the RVC. If you haven't listened to Part 1 yet it is highly recommended that you listen to that episode first as we dive right back in here in the second part. In this two-part podcast mini-series we start with a refresher of the anatomy of the eye and more specifically the anatomy and function of the cornea. We then discuss causes of corneal pathology and the spectrum of severity in ulcerative keratitis. Examination of the patient and appropriate treatment according to severity are discussed and the podcast mini-series is rounded off with some chat about corneal transplant and a quick tangent on diabetic cataracts!

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 27 Corneal ulceration - Part 1

    Sun, 9 Nov 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 42:39

    Finally some Ophthalmology! Corneal ulceration (ulcerative keratitis) is a problem that is encountered commonly in small animal practice and the approach to treatment depends on a good understanding of the severity of the problem in the individual patient. In this two-part podcast mini-series we start with a refresher of the anatomy of the eye and more specifically the anatomy and function of the cornea. We then discuss causes of corneal pathology and the spectrum of severity in ulcerative keratitis. Examination of the patient and appropriate treatment according to severity are discussed and the podcast mini-series is rounded off with some chat about corneal transplant and a quick tangent on diabetic cataracts! I am joined for this feast of Ophthalmology by Màrian Matas Riera who is a lecturer in Ophthalmology here at the RVC. Part 2 of this mini-series will be uploaded in approximately 3 weeks' time.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 26 Tomcat urethral obstruction ('Blocked cats') - Part 2

    Sat, 18 Oct 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 47:02

    This is the second part of my discussion on blocked cats with Dr Rosanne Jepson, Lecturer in Small Animal Internal Medicine and Dominic Barfield, Lecturer in Emergency and Critical Care; and in absentia with Nicola Kulendra, Lecturer in Small Animal Surgery. And of course like in the first episode I can't help but chip in as well! As nentioned in the last post, there is a lot to talk about so we have not been able to plunge into the deepest depths in any one area but this is a very useful overview of the topic.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 25 Tomcat urethral obstruction ('Blocked cats') - Part 1

    Sat, 27 Sep 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 38:19

    Tomcats with urethral obstruction are sadly a common small animal emergency population; this problem is one of the 'classics' no doubt, and with the potential to be fatal. Survival rates in the short-term can be extremely high with the right approach to stabilisation and management, medium-to-long term the prognosis can be more guarded. In a slightly roundtable fashion I am joined to discuss this topic by Dr Rosanne Jepson, Lecturer in Small Animal Internal Medicine; by Dominic Barfield, Lecturer in Emergency and Critical Care; and in absentia by Nicola Kulendra, Lecturer in Small Animal Surgery. And of course I can't help but chip in as well! In this two-part podcast series we discuss a whole host of questions surrounding this disorder including what FLUTD is, approach to the blocked cat, and recommendations following successful intervention. There is a lot to talk about so we have not been able to plunge into the deepest depths in any one area but this is a very useful overview of the topic.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 24 Student extramural studies (EMS) - maximising the potential

    Sun, 7 Sep 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 55:42

    All veterinary students have to undertake extramural studies (EMS) as part of their undergraduate training. How can they go about making the most of these experiences? Many veterinary practices and other organisations offer EMS placements to students. What steps can they take to ensure that not only do students get the most from their placement but also that the practice benefits from having students seeing practice with them? What steps can both parties take to maximise the potential of the EMS experience and ensure that it is as mutually beneficial as possible? These and other things, especially clinical teaching in practice, are what we discuss in this podcast episode for which I am joined by Ruth Serlin and Jane Tomlin. Both Ruth and Jane are very involved in student teaching and development at the RVC and they explain their respective roles further in the podcast.

    Anyone potentially interested in becoming an EMS provider, please see further details HERE.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

  • 23 Angiostrongylus vasorum (canine lungworm)

    Sat, 16 Aug 2014

    Author: Shailen Jasani

    Duration: 54:35

    Angiostrongylosis is a horrible disease affecting dogs not just in the UK but in many other countries besides. The two most commonly reported clinical presentations are associated with spontaneous bleeding or respiratory signs due to verminous pneumonia! In this podcast we discuss this parasitic infection in some depth and I am joined once again by Karen Humm who is a Lecturer in Emergency & Critical Care (ECC) at the QMHA and a co-Director of the Transfusion Medicine service.

    In the podcast Karen and I were not entirely clear about exactly what the two licensed veterinary preparations are licensed for...I am not sure I am any more clear so here are some links for you to check them out!

    Milbemax

    Advocate

    Alongside this podcast, I have also just published a short blog piece summarising a couple of papers on A. vasorum recently published in The Veterinary Record which you can find HERE.

    As always, if you have any comments about this podcast, please get in touch (email sjasani@rvc.ac.uk; tweet @RoyalVetCollege using #saclinpod; or use the RVC's Facebook page).

    Please take 30 seconds (!) to rate the podcasts in iTunes +/- write a review! Thanks. And remember we are now also on Stitcher Radio.

    PS. In the podcast Karen mentions some parasite that has a life-cycle which as you can tell she finds very exciting! She was keen I shared the link with you so here you go!